Alpacas for Bagel

Animals / Nature

coherentinsanity:

strangebiology:

ALL* the fanged deer species

*except some of these have multiple species therein

Water Chevrotain (in the family Tragulidae, not cervidae, like true deer)

Musk Deer (In the family Moschidae)

Tufted Deer

Muntjac

Chinese Water Deer

Swiggity swag, I’ll fucking bite you I swear to me mum

(via kootibang)

— 2 days ago with 3596 notes
markscherz:

scinewscom:

Family Tree Sheds More Light on Transition from Dinosaurs to Birdshttp://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-family-tree-transition-dinosaurs-birds-02175.html

I am intrigued by the relatively low number of polytomies going on here. Far lower than typical for this tree - I will have to read the paper. But perhaps when I am less inundated with osteological work to do.

markscherz:

scinewscom:

Family Tree Sheds More Light on Transition from Dinosaurs to Birds

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-family-tree-transition-dinosaurs-birds-02175.html

I am intrigued by the relatively low number of polytomies going on here. Far lower than typical for this tree - I will have to read the paper. But perhaps when I am less inundated with osteological work to do.

— 2 days ago with 510 notes

markscherz:

house-of-gnar:

Fluorescent Embryos 

[Image 1] Chick ectopic limb. An FGF-4-soaked bead was implanted at stage 14. The embryo was fixed four days later, and stained with alcian blue to reveal the developing cartilage of the skeleton. An ectopic limb can be seen developing next to the normal forelimb, and the bead is still present in the body wall. 

[Image 2] Confocal fluorescence microscopy of a multistained Capitella larva. 

[Image 3] Confocal image of Crepidula fornicata (slipper limpet) embryo stained for FMRF (yellow), Acetylated tubulin (green) F-actin (purple; phalloidin) and DAPI (blue; nuclei).

[Image 4] Confocal image of squid, Loligo pealei, embryo stained for for F-actin (red; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (green), and DAPI (blue; nuclei). 

[Image 5] Mouse embryo, day E9.5. Widefield fluorescence image showing immunostaining with anti-Tuj1 (orange) and anti-glucagon (green), counterstained with DAPI (cyan). 

[Image 6] Confocal image of squid, Loligo pealei, embryo stainedd for F-actin (green; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (red), anti-HRP (yellow), and DAPI (blue; nuclei).

[Image 7] Luminal tracheal staining of a Drosophila embryo.

source

This is FRAKKING awesome.

— 3 days ago with 58 notes

lamarghe73:

Ashol Pan.

13 year old Ashol Pan is one of the estimated last 250 Mongolian eagle hunters left in the world. And one of the very few women that are granted the privilege to be trained in this ancient, traditional hunting method. Golden eagles are used mainly to hunt foxes during the winter months.

Some images courtesy of Caters News Agency.

(via kristenacampora)

— 4 days ago with 12549 notes
boys-and-suicide:

How can you not like alpacas? My dream has always been to ride one to school and if someone made fun of me I’d tell him to spit on them. Cause that’s what the do. Look at their smiles!! It melts my heart.

boys-and-suicide:

How can you not like alpacas? My dream has always been to ride one to school and if someone made fun of me I’d tell him to spit on them. Cause that’s what the do. Look at their smiles!! It melts my heart.

(via adoptpets)

— 5 days ago with 3066 notes
rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?
The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?
by Priscilla Long
Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.

They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.

In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?

The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?

by Priscilla Long

Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.
They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.
In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

(via spectacularuniverse)

— 5 days ago with 384 notes